Wood Finishing Tips for Modular Home Owners

Modular homes are fun and easy – considering that most of it is readymade. Still, as a homeowner, you would like to do some things to make it feel more home-y. If you’re someone who loves working with wood, you can do DIY wood projects to whip up some cool wood furniture for your home. When it comes to cutting the wood, it obviously comes down to choosing the right chainsaw. You need to keep certain things in mind, like the budget, the warranty, the price range, the performance, extra features and reviews from people who have already used them. And when it comes to finishing the wood, many other factors come to play. The most important ones are listed below!

Wood Finishing Tips for Modular Home Owners

Hand-Sand the Curves

Sand curved surfaces—and different areas an electric sander can’t reach—by hand. Treat all regions similarly, utilizing a similar movement of sandpaper for both hand and power sanding. Begin with 80-grit to sand away flaws, at that point utilize 120-grit and then 180-grit. Utilizing the exact same grits as we mentioned isn’t imperative (100-150-180 works as well), yet it’s essential to advance in steps, evacuating further scratches and leaving better scratches each time.

Sand Without Scratches

A random orbital sander leaves scratches that are for completely undetectable, so you can sand crosswise over joints where sand alters its course. Be that as it may, move gradually (around 1 inch for each second) and apply light weight. Else, you’ll get swirly scratches.

Test Stains Thoroughly!

You can’t depend on those stain tests in plain view in stores. True color shifts a ton, contingent upon the sort of wood and how you set it up for finishing up. So take samples from your project, run them through the same sanding procedure and utilize them to test finishes. In the event that you didn’t sample the thing you’re completing, run tests on an unnoticeable region—the underside of a table, for instance. Test recolor on scraps to get the shading you need. Leaving overabundance recolor on the wood for more or shorter periods won’t influence the color much. In the event that it’s a custom shading you’re after, you can blend stains of a similar brand.

Test Clear Finishes, Too

Oil-based poly has a golden tone that can drastically change the color of stained or unstained wood. Water-based polyurethane influences the color to some extent as well.

Sand with the Grain

Sand with the grain when hand sanding or utilizing a belt sander. Scratches are difficult to see when they run parallel to the grain. Be that as it may, even the lightest scratches over the grain are self-evident, particularly after staining.

Assess Before You Stain

Turn out the lights and point a flashlight at a low edge over the wood to uncover defects. Cover the problematic areas with concealing tape and sand them out.

Consider a Wood Conditioner

A few woods ingest recolor unevenly, which causes dull blotches to show up. Birch, maple, pine and cherry would all be able to play this monstrous trap on you. It’s difficult to dispose of this impact, yet you can confine it by applying a wood conditioner before staining. Conditioner additionally keeps wood’s end grain from engrossing more stain than the face grain. Get a quart at a home point or paint store.

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