Modular Homes and Traditional Homes are More Similar Than You Think

Most people assume that modular homes and traditionally built homes are drastically different.  And confusing modular homes and mobile homes is common, even though they are nowhere near the same thing.  In fact, modular homes have more in common with traditional homes than mobile ones.  The primary difference between a modular home and traditional homes is where some of the building takes place.

Modular homes are predominately built indoors.  Tasks like wall assembly and truss creation are handled at a different location, and then the pieces are sent to the build location.  Then, the sections are assembled and any finish work is completed.  That means the only real difference between a modular and traditional home is where some of the production is completed.

So, since modular homes are essentially the same as traditional homes, that means you have more options than you may have anticipated.  To help you understand everything a modular home has to offer, here are some traditional home options that work for modular homes too.

Modular Homes and Traditional Homes are More Similar Than You Think

Basements

A basement is actually just an alternative to a traditional foundation.  It provides additional space by creating a more substantial structure, but its fundamental purpose to provide a solid base for the rest of the home remains.  Modular homes can be constructed over basement foundations as easily as any other option, though the construction of a basement is an added expense.

Basements have to be properly engineered, and the plans have to be approved before it can be created.  While this is no different than other build plans, the requirements may be more stringent depending on the area in which you live.  Once the shape is constructed, inspections may be required before the upper level can be added.  Additionally, basement waterproofing should be completed to keep the space dry for the long-term.

Heated Floors

While some of the primary structure of the floor may be created offsite, the finishing of the spaces isn’t completed until everything is onsite.  That means you can add certain features, including heated floors, as part of the primary construction.  Now, it is better if you can discuss this intention with your builder early on in the process, as there are multiple types of heated floor installations.

For example, some heated floors are run through a concrete slab, making them a better option for construction in certain areas of the country.  Others run through the air space under the floor, though they may be less efficient than slab-based options.

Since the type of installation can dictate certain construction choices, or even the timing of when specific tasks are completed, so you should ideally include these options during the original planning phase.  However, the most important point, is that you don’t have to completely eliminate the option simply because your home is modular.

And Many More

If there is an option you have seen in other homes, and you want to know if they can be added to a modular, the easiest way to proceed is to speak with your designer or contractor.  They will be able to let you know what options can be added, and if certain choices will dictate the construction of other areas.  In most cases, the options available in a traditionally constructed home and a modular home will be the same.